Special Content


SOHO's Greatest Hits - Volume 5

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The following images are a compilation of the best anomalies found from the Soho probe by SolarWatcher.

SOHO, the Solar & Heliospheric Observatory, is a project of international collaboration between ESA and NASA to study the Sun from its deep core to the outer corona and the solar wind.



 
"I, Pet Goat II by Heliofant" Analysis[Part 2]

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My analysis of the "I, Pet Goat II by Heliofant"
Feel free to add thoughts on specific clips in this part one compilation and see if we can get more of an understanding of what is being prepared for us.





 
"I, Pet Goat II by Heliofant" Analysis[Part 1]

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My analysis of the "I, Pet Goat II by Heliofant"
Feel free to add thoughts on specific clips in this part one compilation and see if we can get more of an understanding of what is being prepared for us.





 
The Sinking Of Japan (2006) Coincidence?

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Clips from the movie 'Sinking of Japan' (2006)

 
Australian Radar Anomalies June 26, 2012

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Radar Anomaly Found June 26th

 
Gamma Rays from March X-Flare Detected By Fermi
Wednesday, 13 June 2012 05:03

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During a powerful solar blast in March, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected the highest-energy light ever associated with an eruption on the sun. The discovery heralds Fermi's new role as a solar observatory, a powerful new tool for understanding solar outbursts during the sun's maximum period of activity.
"For most of Fermi's four years in orbit, its Large Area Telescope (LAT) saw the sun as a faint, steady gamma-ray source thanks to the impacts of high-speed particles called cosmic rays," said Nicola Omodei, an astrophysicist at Stanford University in California. "Now we're beginning to see what the sun itself can do."

Solar eruptions are now on the rise as the sun progresses toward the peak of its roughly 11-year-long activity cycle, now expected in mid-2013.




 
Forecasting Solar Storms

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U-M Professor Tamas Gombosi discusses the impact of solar flares on satellite functions and US infrastructure, and the work of U-M researchers in forecasting solar storms to aid in preventative measures.
According to Gombosi, we are heading into Solar Maximum -- the period of greatest solar activity that happens once every 11 years. During that time, a solar storm will occur approximately every month, and preventative action needs to be taken to avoid damage to our infrastructure.
The Center for Space Environment Modeling (http://csem.engin.umich.edu/) at the University of Michigan is attempting to simulate these solar flares in order to aid in the forecasting of solar storms, and to allow for that preventative action.
ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR: Tamas Gombosi is the Rollin M. Gerstacker Professor of Engineering in the Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences (http://aoss.engin.umich.edu/). His research focuses on planetary science, space weather, heliospheric and magnetospheric physics and high-performance scientific computing.

Special Thanks to EQReporter for the video upload

 
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